Ashley Simoniak and Kaele Snapp

Faculty member: Prof. Stacey White and Brent Nuttall 

​SLO 2.0

Each city is unique, each with its own set of attributes and issues. San Luis Obispo, known by some as the “happiest city” is no exception. While it has amazing weather, access to gorgeous open space and beaches, a well-known University and many other wonderful qualities, jobs / housing balance, affordability and access to head of household jobs are an ongoing challenge. If these issues go unaddressed the City is at risk to being in violation of its own Climate Action Plan and Housing Element, which could compromise its ability to qualify for state and federal funding as well as negatively impact the City’s livability (a very unhappy prospect indeed). A well-funded and locally active developer (me) has recently acquired a property near downtown with plans to purchase two nearby parcels as well. You have been asked to propose a project and complete detailed design for its highest and best use. While the developer (I) certainly have opinions about what that might entail, you’ve been asked to challenge the status quo and propose what you think is most appropriate for the given site(s). The project site is located in the Railroad District and South Broad Street Corridor in a vibrant and diverse (ethnically, and economically) neighborhood. Unlike many areas of San Luis Obispo, the residents embrace both authentic historic architectural references and contemporary design solutions, increased density and redevelopment (if done right). The neighborhood is considered “walkable” with many neighborhood amenities. Many in the area opt to bike commute instead of drive despite the lack of dedicated bike lanes, but would like to see increased infrastructure to support safe biking.

Ashley Simoniak and Kaele Snapp

Ashley Simoniak and Kaele Snapp

Ashley Simoniak and Kaele Snapp

Ashley Simoniak and Kaele Snapp

 

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